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Canajoharie, NY ,

Joshua Thomas
Erin Tobin, New York State Preservation League regional director of Technical and Grant Programs for the eastern half of the state, spoke to the Canajoharie Village Board on Tuesday evening. Tobin informed the group "what historic preservation might mean to the community."

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Village board adopts budget, tree policy, and hears historic district information

Wednesday, April 03, 2013 - Updated: 6:47 AM

By JOSHUA THOMAS

C-S-E Editor

CANAJOHARIE — Nobody spoke during a budget-focused public hearing prior to Tuesday's village of Canajoharie meeting. The board adopted a budget with the same property tax as last year — $17.04 per $1,000 of assessed valuation, no increase in sewer tax, and water tax that decreased from $6 to $4.75 per $1,000.

"We are, I believe, heading in the right direction," stated Mayor Francis Avery.

During the meeting, Avery spoke of village trees located between the curb and sidewalk. While he said there is "no hard and fast policy regarding trees," in the past, any tree that impacted water or sewer lines was removed. The village's insurance agency also informed them that a diseased or dead tree should be removed, as it's the village's obligation to make roadways safe.

Avery proposed a policy wherein any healthy tree be left alone by village workers —  and it's up to the homeowner to remove it at their discretion if it's not impacting infrastructure or roadways — yet no more new trees should be planted between the curb and sidewalk. 

The village board fully supported the proposal.

Erin Tobin, New York State Preservation League regional director of Technical and Grant Programs for the eastern half of the state, spoke to the Canajoharie Village Board on Tuesday evening. Tobin informed the group "what historic preservation might mean to the community."

She first informed the board, which sought details regarding the process of national historic register designation in the village, that the first step toward a designation would be a Cultural Resource Survey, for which grant funding is available annually. The pertaining grant application for the Cultural Resource Survey, which would be the first step "at a community looking at its historical resources", including buildings, structures and landscapes, must be submitted before May 1.

If a National Historic District is named, which can include buildings that are only locally significant, it's primarily an honorary designation, said Tobin, explaining that as a part of the district, the state looks at the impact on historic resources for state and federal interventions. 

She noted that private property owners in the district may still do whatever they want to their home with their own money. She said an advantage of historic designation is the NYS Rehabilitation Tax Credit Program, which can provide tax credits for property owners who wish to make improvements. Properties receiving work in the district, that meet preservation standards, can apply for a 20 percent tax credit toward the cost.

The village board also officially approved the Canajoharie Volunteer Fire Department's proposal to allow 16 year olds into membership. After their approval, the proposal must remain on the floor for 30 days, meaning that the fire department is free to adopt the new policy just less than a month from now.

     

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