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Friday, October 24, 2014
Canajoharie, NY ,

From the C-S-E files - Down Memory Lane - Fourth grades of the Fort Plain Central School presented an interesting program in the elementary school cafetorium Monday evening, April 11, 1960, in conjunction with the regular monthly meeting of the Fort Plain Parent Teacher Organization. Approximately 200 members of the organization, parents and friends applauded the realistic puppet show, “Beauty and the Beast”, presented by the fourth grade pupils of Lucius Gotti at the Nelliston school, and the creative play “When American Was New,” staged by the fourth grade pupils of Mrs. Dorothy Mahl, Mrs. Margaret Miller and Mrs. Lena Seguin. Pictured above, left to right were Linda Rice, the Dutch girl of New Amsterdam; Edward Herb, a Pilgrim boy; David Croce, Columbus; Gregory MacKenzie, Abraham Lincoln; Betty Jo Fox and Rocco D’Arcangelis, Indian girl and boy; Brenda Kapp, who was attired as the Statue of Liberty, and Robert Downes as Paul Revere.

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Looking back

Thursday, April 07, 2011 - Updated: 7:39 AM

Canajoharie

Twenty Years Ago

The Canajoharie Library and Art Gallery will celebrate the completion of its newly-completed major expansion and renovation project with a special open house. The open house will feature art exhibits in both the original gallery area, as well as the Library’s new hexagonal gallery.

Despite little wind, it was a great day for the kite-flying demo, which was sponsored by the Canajoharie-Palatine Bridge Tourism Committee.

BSA Troop 81, under the leadership of Stephen A. Becker, scoutmaster, is celebrating 60 years as a troop this year. But as we look back at the accomplishments of the past scouts, we cannot forget the accomplishments of today’s scouts. In 1980, Troop 81 participated in 22 activities including six camp outs, two hikes, eight service projects and three fund-raisers.

An invitation is extended to the community to attend the installation of Rev. Edward Gazel at the Reformed Church, Front St., Canajoharie. A reception in Fellowship Hall, will follow the service.

Thirty Years Ago

For the first time in the memory of most area residents, the long familiar regular five-stick packages of gum, known throughout the world as Beech-Nut and Care-Free, is no longer rolling from the high speed wrapping machines at the Canajoharie Life Savers plant as work is progressing on a schedule in shutting down Plant 1 operations of that firm and consolidating local manufacturing in Plant 2 buildings on Erie Boulevard. All phases of the stick gum operations have now ceased and crews are in the progress of removing the machinery from Building 9. Owned by Beech-Nut Foods Corp., it has been leased for the past few years by Life Savers. In the consolidation move recently announced by Life Savers, the regular stick operation will end in Canajoharie and the Care Free gum, a sugarless product, will be manufactured at a plant built within the past few years in Puerto Rico, where a large share of this product has been manufactured in past months.

The Palatine Town Board began plans for the possible construction of a new town garage to house the town’s highway department, with Supervisor Miles Frasier appointing a committee to seek a possible site for the new facility.

A large flatbed tractor-trailer, ladened with over 80,000 pounds of logs, careened out of control down Murray Hill Road, Ephratah, crossed Route 10, crashed through a chain-link fence and smashed into the side of the stone Niagara Mohawk Power Co. station.

Forty Years Ago

A record $594,642.55 budget was adopted by the Canajoharie Village Board following the annual public hearing with Mayor John Tooker presiding, calling for a 50 cents per $1,000 raise in the $12.50 tax rate.

Fort Plain

Twenty Years Ago

A fire in the village of Fort Plain is believed to have been ignited by a discarded glass bottle, which acted like a magnifying glass. Fourteen firemen responded to the call. Handlines and brooms were utilized in quickly extinguishing the blaze, which department officials said may have been caused by the bottom of a glass bottle, so positioned as to magnify the sun’s rays, triggering the fire.

The Fort Plain Bowling Alley, on Willett Street in the village of Fort Plain, has a new owner and a new name. Bill and Gail Perlaki purchased the building and property last year with the expressed intent to stay with it, and as time goes on, to continually update and improve the facility. “We’re not going to just hang on to it for a couple of years and then turn it over,” Bill said. “We’re gonna stay with it.” The name, Ya’lls Lounge, actually developed because of the couple’s southern accent, both being natives of the state of Florida, at one time was the friendly butt of restaurant clientele jokes about that “old southern drawl.”

Thirty Years Ago

Fort Plain firemen were called to Nelliston two days in a row to quell first a grass fire off Enoch Lane, and then a fire in a pile of ties along ConRail tracks.

Louis Conrad was re-elected chief of the Fort Plain Fire Department and George E. Wilmer was renamed president for the 31st year at the annual meeting. Also elected were james Mallett, first assistant chief; David Bowman, second assistant chief; David Bouck, captain, Company 1; Kenneth Dingman, lieutenant, Company 1; William Fuelleman, captain, Company 2 and Virgil Heiser, lieutenant, Company 2.

Forty Years Ago

The town meeting, moderated by Assemblywoman Mary Anne Krupsak to measure public opinion on the legislative issue, “Should There Be Public Support For Private School?,” was held in the VFW Home.

The new house of worship of the Fords Bush Bible Church at Fordsbush and Clark roads, was dedicated recently before an overflow of parishioners, friends and visiting clergy. The welcoming message was extended by the Rev. David M. Krehbiel, pastor.

St. Johnsville

Twenty Years Ago

St. Johnsville residents can expect a more than $3 increase in the village budget, which was approved by the board and included a projected loss of $52,000 in state revenue. The $578,149 spending plan calls for an increase of $3.30 per $1,000 of assessed valuation over the current budget, hiking the village tax rate up to $22.80 per $1,000. The 1990-91 rate was $19.50 per $1,000. The budget calls for $353,501 to be raised by taxes, an increase of around $53,000.

St. Johnsville now has a new mayor. Dominick Stagliano was sworn-in before the start of the reorganizational meeting held in the Community House. Outgoing Mayor Josephine Terricola presented Mayor Stagliano with the gavel. She said that she had supported Stagliano in his mayoral quest because he possesses the two things she considers necessary; an active interest in the village, and a caring for the village. Terricola also offered the new mayor whatever help may be necessary.

Ben Conte, agriculture teacher at St. Johnsville Central School, has been nominated for the Reader’s Digest 1991 American Heroes in Education Awards, a national program honoring educators who are making a difference in U.S. schools.

Thirty Years Ago

A deeply disturbed citizenry gathered at the Community House at a public hearing to offer input on a proposed village budget calling for a tax rate hike of $6 per $1,000 of assessed valuation, which if enacted, would bring the rate up to a record $38 per $1,000.

The annual meeting of the St. Johnsville Volunteer Fire Department was held recently with 40 members present. Officers were elected with Gary Swartz renamed chief. Others elected included Donald Hoffman, first assistant chief; Bernard Haak, second assistant chief; Roland Swartz, treasurer; and James Failing, secretary. Swart was also elected to the Montgomery County Advisory Board.

     

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