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Monday, September 01, 2014
Canajoharie, NY ,
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Canajoharie Town Board amends dog law, determines voting districts

Tuesday, April 09, 2013 - Updated: 1:59 AM

By JOSHUA THOMAS

C-S-E Editor

CANAJOHARIE -- Prior to the Canajoharie Town Board's monthly meeting, a public hearing took place, focused on amending the current dog law to add regulations regarding purebred licensing within the town.

Since at least one person has a purebred kennel in the town, and purebred licensing stipulations weren't included in the originally adopted town dog law, the board felt it was best to add rules regarding purebred breeding. Nobody spoke during the public hearing, and the board adopted the amendment after some discussion. A fee schedule was also adopted, though not added to the law.

Town Clerk Susan Smith noted that she basically copied the town of Minden's existing law, although she said it might be wise to add limits regarding purebred animals, as Minden's law "didn't limit the number of dogs, and they're having trouble with people who are pretty much starting puppy mills."

Although Smith mentioned that it might be helpful to limit the amount of dogs on a property at any given time to 50, the board, uncertain of whether they can legally do so, or if it's in their best interest to implement a limit, decided to research the issue further prior to adding a stipulation to the law.

Town board members, working with the Montgomery County Board of Elections, finalized Canajoharie's voting district plan. When new legislative districts were drawn, it basically divided the town in half, also dividing and increasing the amount of voting districts. In order to keep the number of voting districts to three, and to keep costs down for taxpayers, it was decided that the western half of the town would be one voting district, contained in legislative district 1. The village will also be a separate district, as will the eastern half of the town, both contained within legislative district 3. 

The three voting districts are of equal size and population.

The eastern half of the town will now vote in Ames, while the western part will vote at a location to be determined, with village residents most likely voting at the village office. The county will determine the official polling places and notify voters in the near future.

The board supported this separation, which they took part in determining, largely because limiting the number of voting districts also limits the number of election inspectors required, working at a cost of $1,000 per day. While some voters will now have to drive a couple extra miles, board members thought the extra miles would offset the money saved.

     

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